Beware the dangers of ‘up-titling’

December 9th, 2019 @

career cv resume

Ensuring your résumé honestly references your titles as well as your actual work responsibilities can be a conundrum for job seekers.

Many job titles nowadays don’t reflect the actual work being done on the job.

Whether the person who wrote them was clueless or poorly intentioned during the writing process, what ends up happening to the employee is that they are stuck with one thing: A job title on their résumé that doesn’t fit…or sucks altogether.

Poor job titles are everywhere

I recently had a client that worked at one of the biggest sportswear brand companies with the title of “manager,” even though he was clearly operating at a vice president-level role.

He’s not alone with this problem that literally is holding him back. Over the years, I consistently see inaccurate job titles on client’s résumés. And to be frank, many workers are fed up.

Having an inaccurate job title can be embarrassing, off-putting and even act as a deterrent for moving forward in one’s career.

In fact, a lower title ends up dragging them backwards or making the person look under-employed.

RELATED STORY: Top ‘harmless’ résumé lies that cause big-time hurt

Why the job title problem exists

The job title problem starts with the boss.

Sometimes bosses are reluctant to change a job title (usually upwards) due to the correlating expectation that a salary increase is close to follow. Other times, they simply don’t have a full grasp of what it is that you do day in and day out.

That’s why it is important to discuss your job duties with your supervisor every time you have an annual review.

By going over the types of tasks and projects you’ve handled over the past year, you can request to revisit the actual job description and position title to make sure it is calibrated accurately.

If a manager is smart, they will realize that by keeping job titles and descriptions current, they are better prepared to hire appropriate talent should a vacancy come open because it is a better reflection of what the job actually does.

‘Up-titling’ problems

But be cautious about taking matters into your own hands.

Up-titling is a new buzzword, but not new to the people reading your résumé.

This word means the process where people over time and through frustration, end up changing the job title on their résumé for the position that they held, and “massage” it into something more accurate.

But this too can set one’s career backwards.

Theoretically, let’s say you apply for a job with altered job titles on your résumé. Everything is going well, and you’ve made it into final consideration after multiple interviews.

What’s next? The employment verification process. And this is precisely where many people hit stumbling blocks.

The job titles and dates listed in your résumé should match exactly what is on your file in the human resources office.

If it doesn’t, that raises red flags…and that’s where many people get into trouble.

You always want to be accurate and truthful in your résumé.

RELATED STORY: Recognizing workplace psychopaths

How to make the fix

There is a way to convey what you want to say about your job duties/career level without making changes on your résumé that could come back and bite you. The solution is to provide both pieces of information.

In the example of my client who was a manager but really at the VP level, we switched things up as follows:

North American Manager (equivalent to: Vice President)

By leading with the actual job title, you are being truthful and reflecting what the company has on file as your accurate job title.

And by adding the equivalency, you are also helping convey to a potential employer the following:

“Even though I didn’t hold this title in NAME, I still had this level of responsibility.”

This approach helps you kill both birds with one stone to achieve what you need to get across in the résumé.

psychology masks

Another trap to avoid

Sometimes, people have worked multiple roles within the same company.

All too often, however, they will write their résumé to only list the highest-level job held at the company while including the start date of the first (lower level) job they held.

This is another trap to avoid, because it isn’t truthful, either.

For example, if you started out as a receptionist in 2000, got promoted into manager in 2005, then rose into a vice president position in 2015 at a company, you can’t say that you were a VP from 2000 onwards.

It’s tempting to lump all of one’s experience under the highest job title, but you are setting yourself up for disaster.

While you aren’t really up-titling, you are date-consolidating, and that’s the same type of issue.

Being honest helps you

What most people don’t realize is that showing a career progression by listing each position held and the dates worked in a tiered format actually demonstrates that you have been a valued company asset.

Plus, your titles and dates match what is on file in the human resources department.

It is critical that you are always transparent and forthright about your job titles and dates worked so that you never have to worry about discrepancies popping up, especially if an employer is considering making you an offer.

The post Beware the dangers of ‘up-titling’ appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Beware the dangers of ‘up-titling’

December 9th, 2019 @

career cv resume

Ensuring your résumé honestly references your titles as well as your actual work responsibilities can be a conundrum for job seekers.

Many job titles nowadays don’t reflect the actual work being done on the job.

Whether the person who wrote them was clueless or poorly intentioned during the writing process, what ends up happening to the employee is that they are stuck with one thing: A job title on their résumé that doesn’t fit…or sucks altogether.

Poor job titles are everywhere

I recently had a client that worked at one of the biggest sportswear brand companies with the title of “manager,” even though he was clearly operating at a vice president-level role.

He’s not alone with this problem that literally is holding him back. Over the years, I consistently see inaccurate job titles on client’s résumés. And to be frank, many workers are fed up.

Having an inaccurate job title can be embarrassing, off-putting and even act as a deterrent for moving forward in one’s career.

In fact, a lower title ends up dragging them backwards or making the person look under-employed.

RELATED STORY: Top ‘harmless’ résumé lies that cause big-time hurt

Why the job title problem exists

The job title problem starts with the boss.

Sometimes bosses are reluctant to change a job title (usually upwards) due to the correlating expectation that a salary increase is close to follow. Other times, they simply don’t have a full grasp of what it is that you do day in and day out.

That’s why it is important to discuss your job duties with your supervisor every time you have an annual review.

By going over the types of tasks and projects you’ve handled over the past year, you can request to revisit the actual job description and position title to make sure it is calibrated accurately.

If a manager is smart, they will realize that by keeping job titles and descriptions current, they are better prepared to hire appropriate talent should a vacancy come open because it is a better reflection of what the job actually does.

‘Up-titling’ problems

But be cautious about taking matters into your own hands.

Up-titling is a new buzzword, but not new to the people reading your résumé.

This word means the process where people over time and through frustration, end up changing the job title on their résumé for the position that they held, and “massage” it into something more accurate.

But this too can set one’s career backwards.

Theoretically, let’s say you apply for a job with altered job titles on your résumé. Everything is going well, and you’ve made it into final consideration after multiple interviews.

What’s next? The employment verification process. And this is precisely where many people hit stumbling blocks.

The job titles and dates listed in your résumé should match exactly what is on your file in the human resources office.

If it doesn’t, that raises red flags…and that’s where many people get into trouble.

You always want to be accurate and truthful in your résumé.

RELATED STORY: Recognizing workplace psychopaths

How to make the fix

There is a way to convey what you want to say about your job duties/career level without making changes on your résumé that could come back and bite you. The solution is to provide both pieces of information.

In the example of my client who was a manager but really at the VP level, we switched things up as follows:

North American Manager (equivalent to: Vice President)

By leading with the actual job title, you are being truthful and reflecting what the company has on file as your accurate job title.

And by adding the equivalency, you are also helping convey to a potential employer the following:

“Even though I didn’t hold this title in NAME, I still had this level of responsibility.”

This approach helps you kill both birds with one stone to achieve what you need to get across in the résumé.

psychology masks

Another trap to avoid

Sometimes, people have worked multiple roles within the same company.

All too often, however, they will write their résumé to only list the highest-level job held at the company while including the start date of the first (lower level) job they held.

This is another trap to avoid, because it isn’t truthful, either.

For example, if you started out as a receptionist in 2000, got promoted into manager in 2005, then rose into a vice president position in 2015 at a company, you can’t say that you were a VP from 2000 onwards.

It’s tempting to lump all of one’s experience under the highest job title, but you are setting yourself up for disaster.

While you aren’t really up-titling, you are date-consolidating, and that’s the same type of issue.

Being honest helps you

What most people don’t realize is that showing a career progression by listing each position held and the dates worked in a tiered format actually demonstrates that you have been a valued company asset.

Plus, your titles and dates match what is on file in the human resources department.

It is critical that you are always transparent and forthright about your job titles and dates worked so that you never have to worry about discrepancies popping up, especially if an employer is considering making you an offer.

The post Beware the dangers of ‘up-titling’ appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Switching gears: Making a change mid-career

February 25th, 2019 @

career success

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average person will have at least 11.7 jobs during their entire work life.

Um, wait. How many?!

Yes, nearly 12 jobs in a lifetime of work. Personally, I think that number is quite low. Many people are pushing 20+ jobs if you count babysitting as a teen through contract/volunteer work in later years.

They all usually add up to a substantial number. The days of retiring from a company with a gold watch are long, long over.

Plus, skill-hungry Millennials are reshaping the world of work to the point that their job changes have also resounded with some employers, who now may perceive long-term employees as stagnant and oftentimes redundant/outdated.

RELATED STORY: Long-term career options for meeting planners

But how does that translate to a career, which is distinctly different yet entirely related to jobs?

Jobs are what you hold at the present moment (i.e. your name, rank and company). Your career is the larger picture. Think of your job as the raft you are floating on, and the career as the river that is carrying you along.

So, what happens when you want to make a change mid-career?

It’s possible, but you need to be mindful before taking that leap mid-stream to jump onto another raft heading to a different destination.

Skill acquisition

Some things to consider include skill acquisition.

Do an inventory of what skills you currently have and review them against your intended career shift. Do you have enough to make the change now? Or do you need to spend a little time beefing them up to broaden your bench strengths.

Remember, it is one thing to think that you can make a change mid-career; it is another to actually try to make that leap. What you believe you are qualified to do (or really want to do) may vary quite widely from the actual skills you possess when you go head-to-head with people who have been doing this all along and come across as very qualified.

Right now, I am working with an attorney who is tired of the rat rate that is the legal field, and she is seeking to transition to operations, which is a very big career departure.

RELATED STORY: Career challenges for planners

In her case, we evaluated everything she has been doing and determined that she has had a big impact on back-office operations by helping train staff, establishing policies and procedures, removing obstacles, improving efficiencies and cutting vendor costs.

This is a start, but she does have some work to do to build out her career skills in operations.

keep learningProfessional development is a good path to pursue. Don’t know how to do a skill? Go take a class and learn it. Presto! Mission accomplished.

But there’s more to making a change mid-career than just adding skills.

Contacts and mentors

You have to build up a whole new universe of contacts.

When I chose to switch careers from being a meeting planner to a résumé writer, I had to completely reinvent myself.

But it actually wasn’t as daunting as one might think.

If you are contemplating a complete career pivot, it’s important to add skills, but you should also join relevant industry organizations. Those entities are the ones who will provide education/training, but also (and more importantly) networking contacts.

When I made my change, it was hard to start from ground zero as I had no credentials other than I had helped students write their résumés.

But the contacts that I made at the National Résumé Writers’ Association were invaluable. Quickly, I learned who the big players and influencers were, as well as the creative types, and began keeping up with their LinkedIn and Facebook posts, as well as tweets to learn more about the business.

Several even took me under their wing and became mentors. That alone is worth its weight in gold when making a change mid-career.

RELATED STORY: Help me help you: Etiquette and mentors

Mentors can answer questions, provide guidance, assess your work and provide constructive criticism, and also be your cheerleaders. Believe me, there will be times during a career pivot that you feel like you’ve made a terrible mistake. Mentors will help you from second-guessing yourself and provide a much-needed shot in the arm as you make your way through unfamiliar landscapes.

Making changes mid-career can be very scary, but with the right tools, knowledge, connections and resources, you can definitely be successful in switching things up.

And as more Millennials and Gen Z workers move through the workforce, I am confident that not only will they have more than 12 jobs in their lifetime, but probably nearly as many different career incarnations.

If there is any one piece of advice that I can share about considering a career transition, it’s this: If you have to work, then you might as well spend that time at work doing something that you enjoy. If you don’t enjoy the purpose of the work, it’s time to find a new career. But before you make the leap, make sure you roll your skills into the next career, and make sure that you continuously grow so you are ready for the next career transition if and when it comes.

The post Switching gears: Making a change mid-career appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Assessing and identifying stakeholders

June 25th, 2018 @

For every meeting and event professional, there are 1,000+ stakeholders standing behind them.

From the boss to the board to the client to the supplier, there are a lot of people invested in the success of the meeting, conference, exhibition or event. And your job, as the event magician, is to find out what’s going to make these people walk away happy.

Company stakeholders businessEasy, huh?

Nope.

And there are 10 million nightmare scenarios that many meeting professionals have experienced that have thwarted making 100% of stakeholders 100% happy.

Lucky you.

Building buy-in and more importantly, meeting the expectations of your stakeholders is an extremely delicate balancing act.

It requires diplomatic savvy, impeccable ability to read people for unarticulated needs, a keen sense of available resources and the most acute skill of all: critical thinking.

Effective stakeholders are ones who can see the various needs of the stakeholders as pieces in the larger jigsaw puzzle. They also know how to get everything to fit, and how to negotiate the give-and-take that is part of the stakeholder management process.

Your first step in assessing and clarifying stakeholders is to start at the bulls eye of the event.

  • Who is directly going to benefit from it?
  • Who has skin in the game regarding the event/meeting outcome?
  • Who else can you partner with to improve the meeting?

conversationTruly, the process really starts with initiating conversations. Stakeholders are more than ready to share with you what they want…and by simply engaging in active listening, you gain better insights into what they see as the benefit.

Start at the beginning, which is really the end.

  • How do they see the event transpiring?
  • What’s their meeting vision?
  • What do they want to see happen at the event?

Then ask the critical questions that delve into their core needs (articulated and non-articulated): What is the root of their requests? What is their objective?

Once you have made those contacts, ask the stakeholders:

Who else do you think might be interested in the meeting/event?”

Those referrals can help open up new ideas and doors to opportunity.

Too many times, sales people and meeting professionals forget to ask this question, and this usually means that money and additional opportunities are left on the table.

Once you have identified all of the stakeholders and their needs, then start parsing through your event to discover where you can “plug” them into the meeting vision.

Classify each according to their needs/expectations, and create the opportunities that match.

Then—and this is the most critical phase—develop the plan that will manage all of these stakeholders and deliver on your outlined promises.

By clearly assessing their needs then classifying them, stakeholders feel fulfilled because you met their expectations.

You promised, and you delivered, and that’s the formula for success.

RELATED STORY: Who are your meeting stakeholders and why are they so important?

The post Assessing and identifying stakeholders appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Assessing and identifying stakeholders

June 25th, 2018 @

For every meeting and event professional, there are 1,000+ stakeholders standing behind them.

From the boss to the board to the client to the supplier, there are a lot of people invested in the success of the meeting, conference, exhibition or event. And your job, as the event magician, is to find out what’s going to make these people walk away happy.

Company stakeholders businessEasy, huh?

Nope.

And there are 10 million nightmare scenarios that many meeting professionals have experienced that have thwarted making 100% of stakeholders 100% happy.

Lucky you.

Building buy-in and more importantly, meeting the expectations of your stakeholders is an extremely delicate balancing act.

It requires diplomatic savvy, impeccable ability to read people for unarticulated needs, a keen sense of available resources and the most acute skill of all: critical thinking.

Effective stakeholders are ones who can see the various needs of the stakeholders as pieces in the larger jigsaw puzzle. They also know how to get everything to fit, and how to negotiate the give-and-take that is part of the stakeholder management process.

Your first step in assessing and clarifying stakeholders is to start at the bulls eye of the event.

  • Who is directly going to benefit from it?
  • Who has skin in the game regarding the event/meeting outcome?
  • Who else can you partner with to improve the meeting?

conversationTruly, the process really starts with initiating conversations. Stakeholders are more than ready to share with you what they want…and by simply engaging in active listening, you gain better insights into what they see as the benefit.

Start at the beginning, which is really the end.

  • How do they see the event transpiring?
  • What’s their meeting vision?
  • What do they want to see happen at the event?

Then ask the critical questions that delve into their core needs (articulated and non-articulated): What is the root of their requests? What is their objective?

Once you have made those contacts, ask the stakeholders:

Who else do you think might be interested in the meeting/event?”

Those referrals can help open up new ideas and doors to opportunity.

Too many times, sales people and meeting professionals forget to ask this question, and this usually means that money and additional opportunities are left on the table.

Once you have identified all of the stakeholders and their needs, then start parsing through your event to discover where you can “plug” them into the meeting vision.

Classify each according to their needs/expectations, and create the opportunities that match.

Then—and this is the most critical phase—develop the plan that will manage all of these stakeholders and deliver on your outlined promises.

By clearly assessing their needs then classifying them, stakeholders feel fulfilled because you met their expectations.

You promised, and you delivered, and that’s the formula for success.

RELATED STORY: Who are your meeting stakeholders and why are they so important?

The post Assessing and identifying stakeholders appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Conferences to grow your thought leadership

April 4th, 2018 @

Thought leadership is a concept that many meeting professionals integrate into their own conference or event content.

But what about including it on a personal level?

Thought leadership is a fast way to accomplish many things in one’s career:

  1. Learn about new ideas, concepts, emerging technologies and legal impacts before they actually arrive.
  2. Understand how to implement them into your workplace with practical application.
  3. Help your organization be poised to meet future challenges or opportunities head on, or be ready to springboard ahead of the competition.

By being an early adopter of new concepts, you can not only be a driving force for helping organizations evolve, but also grow your own career by being the catalyst that helps them get there.

Thought leadership, by definition, is literally getting ahead of the proverbial 8 ball.

Business Insider had a great quote about thought leadership in general: “Thought leaders are seen as trustworthy, go-to authorities among industry colleagues and peers,” said Jake Dunlap, CEO and founder of sales consulting firm Skaled.

(CC) Art Jonak

“They possess an innate ability to contribute to the conversations happening today, while also being able to speculate on what is going to happen tomorrow. Rather than chime in on every topic, they set the pace for the industry and offer intelligent insights and informed opinions.”

So how does a meeting professional gain access to thought leadership?

If you haven’t had the opportunity to attend MPI’s World Education Congress, then you should. (This year, it’s happening June 2-5 in Indianapolis—visit www/mpiweb.org/wec18 for complete details.)

The wide-ranging subject matter at this event provides some tasty tidbits of the universe that’s out there.

But to fully capitalize on the menu of thought leadership available, you have to do some digging to uncover where the thought leaders are located, and then head to that conference or event to get fully immersed. Some thought leadership events are aimed at specific job functions, so the content is highly specialized.

Understanding what is about to hit and how that might impact a company or how it does business is a critical thought leadership trait.

Think of it is as the person in the crow’s nest looking at the horizon who yells, “Land ho!”—that’s what you’d be doing. You’ll spot the next destination before anyone else and can help navigate the ship in that direction.

Other types of thought leadership are what I call “Blow the Lid Off” types of learning.

This is the kind of thing that can fundamentally change how you see things, react to them and decide how you can work with or without them. TedX is a great example of this.

There is also a whole other world out there that is based on thought leadership, but it goes in entirely different directions.

Case in point: If you want to know what kind of emerging technologies and innovations are on the way in, the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is a great show to check out. Not everything that gets buzz in this event limelight ends up having staying power in the consumer marketplace, but being exposed to so many new applications can be inspiring.

Similarly, SXSW is the annual digital and interactive media hotspot in Austin, with film, interactive media and music festivals and conferences all congregating within one area. Seeing what is attracting users can have tremendous applicability to your own work.

Recently, I read about C2, an “annual international business conference that helps established and aspiring leaders unlock their creativity in order to better face disruption and change.” It’s been getting a lot of buzz too, and could be a great place to really gain insights on disruption at the executive level. What are they talking about, and how is that going to impact your organization?

The World Business Forum is known as a thought leadership event that “brings together thousands of restless minds united by their passion for business.” With speakers that include CEOs, entrepreneurs, innovators, thinkers, artists and sportspeople, this event can provide inspiration beyond the daily grind and help you rethink how you do business.

Want to get truly savvy with social media? Try going to Content Marketing World which showcases speakers from top global brands discussing the innovations they are introducing with content marketing.

But what if you are fairly new in your career and desire to make a difference? Try the One Young World conference which brings together young leaders who are ready to find ways to solve critical global issues.

Similarly, a lot of women-focused thought leadership conferences have sprung up. BlogHer Conference is one of the most well-known for its networking and ability to inspire, empower and celebrate female influencers, but you might check locally to see if there are other such gatherings taking place closer to home.

Ready to really push your envelope? Burning Man is an off-the-wall gathering that is, well, not for the faint of heart. From what I understand, those that attend Burning Man find it to be completely inspiring (and, of course, sand is in everything).

Sustainability has been and will continue to be a hot topic, and there’s a plethora of thought leadership conferences you can consider.

If none of these get your innovation juices flowing, then a good way to find out what conferences to attend is to start asking colleagues and industry connections what they think is a good source of new ideas.

Now, start making plans to attend!

(Featured image CC Frank-Bernard)

The post Conferences to grow your thought leadership appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

What to do when a recruiter calls you

October 16th, 2017 @

When you least expect it, the phone will ring, and a recruiter will be on the other end of the line, wanting to talk to you about an opportunity.

Sometimes, the timing is serendipitous because you are actively engaged in a job search—it’s like bread falling from heaven!

“Oh boy!” you think to yourself, anticipating the thousands more in salary you can expect to earn now that you are a hot commodity.

But what happens if you are as happy as a clam right where you are, and have no intention of moving on?

You should STILL be interested.

I want you
(CC) MELODY HANSEN

As a passive or active job seeker, you should always listen to what a recruiter has to say. Something caught their eye about you.

When opportunity comes knocking, this is the time to at least open your mind to new possibilities. Be prepared for some pretty specific questions about exactly what it would take for you to change companies. This includes benefits, salary, job duties and title.

Think of this as a great exercise to brush up on your career goals.

And after they make their pitch, and you are still not interested, be respectful and timely in your responses back to the recruiter.

Why?

Because they have long memories, and that cushy job you’ve been enjoying can evaporate at the click on a supervisor’s keyboard. The adage of “don’t burn bridges” comes to mind—recruiters are a tight-knit community, and they talk. If you are rude, dismissive or otherwise unpleasant, word gets around.

Remember: You might not be interested in opportunities right now. But you might be later.

For those job seekers who are actively on the hunt for a new job, besides silently yelling “YES!” away from the phone, this is a good opportunity for you to remember one thing: You are in the driver’s seat.

The recruiter has contacted you because they have a specific need to fill, and you are a likely candidate. But don’t get too full of yourself.

Ask questions back. This is your opportunity to learn more about the employer than what they will typically tell you. Recruiters are also careful about finding the right culture fit, so you need to ask the right questions about how the potential company treats their workers.

If a candidate that the recruiter puts forward doesn’t work out, the recruiter loses that account and they don’t get paid. So it is in their best interest to share as much as they can with you so there is that magic match.

So when a recruiter picks up the phone and calls you, it is in your best interest to listen and consider. It doesn’t mean you have to act.

And who doesn’t love a call from someone who thinks you would be a valuable asset? It’s extremely flattering.

As a final note, there is a common misperception out there that recruiters work for you, the job seeker.

Reality Check: Recruiters work for their client companies, who have hired them to fill a specific job order. Although it may seem that they are a barrier to you and the target company, they are actually your best advocate for getting you the job. So treat them as such.

The post What to do when a recruiter calls you appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Long-term career options for meeting planners

May 3rd, 2017 @

Where will you be in your career within the next five years? 10 years? 15 years?

In short, what kind of career track are you on?

career pathThese are hefty questions when you consider that most of us who fall into this industry fall in love with it, too.

It’s easy to get entangled with the logistics of the daily grind and the meeting industry can be a fickle mistress when it comes to career moves. There aren’t a lot of such options, but the good news is that there are more than you think.

Consider these paths.

Stay put at the same career level.

Some people realize that they are really good at planning meetings/events and sincerely desire to not do anything different. And there’s nothing wrong with that. As we all have likely dealt with a boss-zilla in our lifetimes, some people are good at what they do but aren’t cut out of management cloth. No problem. If you are happy in the job function, then there are some options in this arena so you feel revitalized/challenged in your work. The first step is to add to your body of knowledge. Growing your knowledge base can help you move into step two, which is expanding your job duties. (The MPI Academy and PYM LIVE offer a bevy of opportunities to help you grow professionally.)

Move up and out.

Still feel like you aren’t able to stretch your wings at your current employer? Then you might need to consider changing employers.

Moving up.

For the folks who are career-minded and see a management trajectory in their future, then building the stepping stones of being a capable manager are critical. Do you know how to manage people, resources, budgets and strategies? This can open doors to being a VP of meetings or a similar leadership position. Remember, you need to tell others of your career aspirations and not just assume that they know.

If not this, then what?

You love the industry, and the industry loves you back. But sometimes, you simply get burned out and need something else. So how do you translate this amazing career of meeting/event management wins into something else altogether different? I have a simple answer for you: Operations. Yes. You saw that right. Operations. The reason is that everything you do as a planner is all about keeping things running smoothly. And guess what? That’s what operations managers too. They oversee financial, marketing, sales, programs, deadlines and personnel, to name a few areas. So this can be an easy leap to make.

None of the above.

Going for the full-scale, “I can’t take this anymore” career revamp? Career coaches are a way to go. Believe it or not, meeting planners end up with a Swiss Army knife of skill sets that can go in many directions. A career coach can help you find a new direction that provides that injection of fresh energy, optimism and renewed purpose that many burned-out professionals crave.

 

So keep an eye on the prize—be clear on what your next career goals are, and cultivate the skills that can lead to either renewed passion for your current work or help you find rewarding new opportunities.

The post Long-term career options for meeting planners appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News