Weekly deals and highlights: November 22, 2017

Posted 21 hours, 28 minutes ago @

Topgolf
@Topgolf
Topgolf is the perfect place to host your corporate event! Flexible food & drink catering menu options and a dedicated staff make it fun and easy.


Caesars Entertainment offers meeting and event planners one dedicated team that works as a united front, committed to providing the most successful meeting experiences possible. Enjoy elite perks, rewards and privileges with our Total Rewards Meeting Diamond Program.

Click here to fill out the survey for your chance to win!

The post Weekly deals and highlights: November 22, 2017 appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

3D projection mapping for innovative content delivery

Posted 3 days ago @

It’s impressive how Montreal has embraced 3D projection mapping technology for content delivery.

3D projection mapping has the power to transform environments and event experiences. With this technology, that uses video projectors to display images and footage on a variety of surfaces and shapes, event professionals can create truly immersive experiences. You can transport participants to gardens, mountains, waterfalls, lakes, the desert and, in fact, any setting you choose.

3D projection mapping has applications that transcend décor, staging, backdrops and entertainment. For example, images can be projected on faces and costumes.

Tablescapes anyone?

In conjunction with Montreal’s 375-year anniversary, there are a number of 3D projection mapping installations that deliver historical content in a compelling and memorable way.

Aura

In Old Montreal, the city’s historical district, Notre-Dame Basilica (where Celine Dion was married) is transformed nightly through Aura, a truly immersive 3D projection mapping experience. Aura is a splendid example of how spaces can come to life through the magic of 3D projection mapping.

Aura is a fresh approach to presenting the history and architecture of​ Notre-Dame Basilica, one of Montreal’s most iconic buildings.

Expo 67, live

In 1967, during Canada’s Centennial, Montreal hosted the World’s Fair. Terre des Homme was an important experience in Montreal’s history that energized the city and left a number of legacy event venues and outdoor spaces that are still in use today.

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, a concrete esplanade between the buildings of Place des Arts, which was also unveiled in 1967, was transformed through 3D projection mapping. Expo 67 Live created a living time capsule. This electrifying presentation gave Montrealers a chance to re-live Expo 67 and the era in which it took place. It was also an opportunity to share it with generations that were yet unborn when it took place.

Cité Mémoire – Montréal en Histoires

In collaboration with Michel Marc Bouchard, Montreal artists Michel Lemieux and Victor Pilon have created not one, not two but 29 installations as part of Cité Mémoire – Montréal en Histoires. (The experience started with 23 and more have been added as the year has professed.) In a welcome departure from boring presentations about history, giant tableaus spread throughout Old Montreal, trace the history of the city through engaging, urban multi-media experiences.

Video footage is projected on a variety of surfaces including giant screens, buildings, a clock tower, fountains, trees, alley ways and parks. Some of the tableaus are interactive and, as people move through them, the images are transformed.

Take a peek:

Before heading off to Old Montreal, the public is invited to download the app for guidance to the augmented reality that enhances the experience.

The next time you need to transform an event venue or breathe new life into what would otherwise be boring historical or technical information, consider 3D projection mapping.

(Featured image CC t-mizo)

The post 3D projection mapping for innovative content delivery appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Weekly deals and highlights: November 17, 2017

Posted 5 days, 21 hours ago @

boulder8_16_17_180pxBoulder Convention and Visitors Bureau
Twitter: @VisitBoulder
With cash incentives for your group, classic views, new hotels, and fresh venues, now’s the time to plan your meeting in Boulder.


Caesars Entertainment offers meeting and event planners one dedicated team that works as a united front, committed to providing the most successful meeting experiences possible. Enjoy elite perks, rewards and privileges with our Total Rewards Meeting Diamond Program.

Click here to fill out the survey for your chance to win!

The post Weekly deals and highlights: November 17, 2017 appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Meeting planner scholarships

Posted 1 week ago @

The cost of education—from college all the way to professional development throughout one’s career—can be significant. Knowing this, groups throughout the meeting and event industry have banded together for years to help ensure knowledge and advancement is a reality. The result is that there is now an incredible supply of scholarships to be had—whether you’re a college student preparing for a career in meetings and events or a veteran seeking continuing education—thanks to generous donations from your planner peers, industry suppliers and professional associations.

The following information isn’t all-encompassing, but will help you to plan the next steps in your professional development while tapping into existing funding mechanisms without draining your savings.

MPI Foundation scholarshipsThe MPI Foundation disbursed 268 scholarships in 2016 totaling $306,000. The ways in which these funds can aid your professional career are as wide and varied as the organizations and individuals who sponsor the programs. Following are some examples of available scholarships from the MPI Foundation.

  • The Membership Scholarship covers the cost of a Preferred MPI membership.
  • The Professional Development Scholarship, only available to MPI members, covers, partially or fully, the cost of any MPI Academy courses, including the Certificate in Meeting Management (CMM), the Healthcare Meeting Compliance Certificate (HMCC), MPI’s Experiential Event Series programs and much more (see the MPI Academy’s site for all opportunities).
  • Conference Scholarships, only available to MPI members, cover costs to attend events such as the World Education Congress (WEC), IMEX America and IMEX in Frankfurt.
  • Academic Scholarships are available for students of the Rosen College at the University of Central Florida and universities in Toronto.

The PCMA Education Foundation funds 75 scholarships each year for a variety of specific career development goals to help students and experienced professionals in the industry. Following are some examples of available scholarships from the PCMA Education Foundation.

  • The Convening Leaders Student Scholarship covers registration, accommodations and up to $1,000 in airfare to attend this PCMA conference.
  • The Roy B. Evans Student Scholarship provides $7,500 in tuition assistance to up to two PCMA Student Members.
  • Foundation All Access Pass Professional Scholarships cover registration and accommodations for up to five industry professionals (PCMA membership is not required) to the Convening Leaders conference, access to PCMA Premium Content and the Business Event Bootcamp.
  • The Diversity Student Scholarship grants $2,500 in tuition assistance to one PCMA Student Member representing a group that “has been traditionally under-represented in the meetings and events industry.”

The Network of Executive Women in Hospitality (NEWH) has given more than $4.5 million in scholarships since its founding in 1984. These funds are reserved for students seeking a career in the hospitality industry. Following are some examples of scholarships from NEWH.

  • The NEWH Women Leaders $5,000 Scholarship is given to one female hospitality management student and also includes a paid trip to attend the Boutique Design Power Players: Women Leaders in Hospitality Breakfast and Panel.
  • The NEWH Clifford R. Tuttle $5,000 Scholarship is given to one student in hospitality interior design and also includes a paid trip to attend HD’s Platinum Circle Awards event.
  • The NEWH Leadership $10,000 Scholarship debuts in 2018 (details are not yet available).
  • The NEWH Green Voice Design Competition $7,500 scholarship is awarded to students of hospitality interior design or architecture and also includes a paid trip to attend the HD EXPO.

The Timothy S. Y. Lam Foundation was established in 2012 as a way to honor its namesake and offer assistance to those in the hospitality industry. The foundation awards $2,000 tuition-based scholarships for students as well as exam-related scholarships to help professionals attain certifications (CMP, CPCE, CSEP).

The International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE) awards Helen Brett Scholarships to students pursuing careers in exhibition management. In 2017, the scholarship was given to two recipients with each receiving $5,000 in tuition assistance. Applications for these scholarships open in March 2018.

The Patti J. Shock Scholarship, offered through a partnership between The International School of Hospitality and The Foundation of NACE (National Association for Catering and Events), grants catering as well as meeting professionals the cost of tuition and fees for the Meeting and Event Catering Certificate Program ($1,800).

There are numerous scholarships specifically available to industry professionals pursuing the Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) designation.

(Preceding image CC NOTTINGHAM TRENT UNIVERSITY)

The post Meeting planner scholarships appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

All-too-common reasons speakers mess up

Posted 1 week, 3 days ago @

While this article is directed at speakers, meeting professionals can sneak a peek to better understand the preparation undertaken by effective speakers. From this, planners can learn to better ascertain the suitability of a specific speaker—and even do some advance prep to ensure things run smoothly.

There are many ways to successfully deliver a presentation and even more ways to fail at it. Here are common mistakes that speakers make—professional speakers included—each of which have to do with a lack of adequate preparation.

Not understanding the assignment

Before ever leaving your own office, it is critical to understand why you have been scheduled to speak to this group at this time. Such understanding necessitates that you read about the organization, get information about the audience’s current challenges and hot buttons and learn what the meeting planner has in mind for the presentation. Five-minute conversations over the phone don’t tend to supply you with all you need to know in that area.

If you’re a celebrity speaker, you are brought in so that attendees can go home and say, “I saw so and so.” It barely matters what you speak about as long as you are semi-coherent and don’t offend the group. From the rest of us, however, the people in the seats desire to hear things that directly relate to the professional and personal challenges they face. Or, they want to hear about issues of universal importance, i.e. affecting their communities, state, nation or the planet.

The only way to come armed with the proper information about the scenario and setting is to spend at least an hour researching the group and the situation.

Failing to know your audience

Beyond understanding the setting and why you are invited to speak, knowing the audience is itself an art and a science.

  • Who are they?
  • What is their age range?
  • What is their educational background?
  • How long have they been with the organization?
  • What is this particular meeting designed to do?
mistakes
(CC) PHINEAS JONES

Probe even further. How far have they come? Do they know each other or are they assembling for the first time? What will they hear before and after the presentation? What did they hear last year or at a similar meeting? How would they like to feel and what would they like to “get” as a result of your presentation—when they leave the room, how will they be changed?

As you can quickly surmise, the answers to these questions are not ones that you can intuit. You have to ask the meeting professional who hired you, the movers and shakers who will be in attendance and other key operatives of the organization. This usually requires an email request, sometimes reviewing the questions by phone since your contacts will be very busy.

Unless you find answers to these types of questions, and there isn’t much more that you could know, don’t accept the presentation. Without this information, your presentation may hit the mark if you are incredibly lucky, but chances are that you will simply dance around the periphery of what you need to do and say to be successful. If it’s a one-time presentation and you don’t intend to do much more speaking, you’ll probably be able to get away with this. If you want to speak professionally, however, there is no effective substitute for knowing the audience.

Not arriving with sufficient clearance time

Whether your presentation is across the world, across the country or across town, increase your probability of success by arriving in plenty of time. This may require coming in the night before you’re scheduled to present.

When you arrive early, you gain a considerable advantage which can often be the make-or-break factor in the success of your presentation. You get to settle in, calm down, check out the facilities, walk the room, talk to people, check out equipment and arrange things. In doing so, you give yourself the edge over the speaker who arrives “just in time.”

These days, with affordable mobile technology, you can be productive all day long wherever you are, so arrive early!

The post All-too-common reasons speakers mess up appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

All-too-common reasons speakers mess up

Posted 1 week, 3 days ago @

While this article is directed at speakers, meeting professionals can sneak a peek to better understand the preparation undertaken by effective speakers. From this, planners can learn to better ascertain the suitability of a specific speaker—and even do some advance prep to ensure things run smoothly.

There are many ways to successfully deliver a presentation and even more ways to fail at it. Here are common mistakes that speakers make—professional speakers included—each of which have to do with a lack of adequate preparation.

Not understanding the assignment

Before ever leaving your own office, it is critical to understand why you have been scheduled to speak to this group at this time. Such understanding necessitates that you read about the organization, get information about the audience’s current challenges and hot buttons and learn what the meeting planner has in mind for the presentation. Five-minute conversations over the phone don’t tend to supply you with all you need to know in that area.

If you’re a celebrity speaker, you are brought in so that attendees can go home and say, “I saw so and so.” It barely matters what you speak about as long as you are semi-coherent and don’t offend the group. From the rest of us, however, the people in the seats desire to hear things that directly relate to the professional and personal challenges they face. Or, they want to hear about issues of universal importance, i.e. affecting their communities, state, nation or the planet.

The only way to come armed with the proper information about the scenario and setting is to spend at least an hour researching the group and the situation.

Failing to know your audience

Beyond understanding the setting and why you are invited to speak, knowing the audience is itself an art and a science.

  • Who are they?
  • What is their age range?
  • What is their educational background?
  • How long have they been with the organization?
  • What is this particular meeting designed to do?
mistakes
(CC) PHINEAS JONES

Probe even further. How far have they come? Do they know each other or are they assembling for the first time? What will they hear before and after the presentation? What did they hear last year or at a similar meeting? How would they like to feel and what would they like to “get” as a result of your presentation—when they leave the room, how will they be changed?

As you can quickly surmise, the answers to these questions are not ones that you can intuit. You have to ask the meeting professional who hired you, the movers and shakers who will be in attendance and other key operatives of the organization. This usually requires an email request, sometimes reviewing the questions by phone since your contacts will be very busy.

Unless you find answers to these types of questions, and there isn’t much more that you could know, don’t accept the presentation. Without this information, your presentation may hit the mark if you are incredibly lucky, but chances are that you will simply dance around the periphery of what you need to do and say to be successful. If it’s a one-time presentation and you don’t intend to do much more speaking, you’ll probably be able to get away with this. If you want to speak professionally, however, there is no effective substitute for knowing the audience.

Not arriving with sufficient clearance time

Whether your presentation is across the world, across the country or across town, increase your probability of success by arriving in plenty of time. This may require coming in the night before you’re scheduled to present.

When you arrive early, you gain a considerable advantage which can often be the make-or-break factor in the success of your presentation. You get to settle in, calm down, check out the facilities, walk the room, talk to people, check out equipment and arrange things. In doing so, you give yourself the edge over the speaker who arrives “just in time.”

These days, with affordable mobile technology, you can be productive all day long wherever you are, so arrive early!

The post All-too-common reasons speakers mess up appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Weekly deals and highlights: November 8, 2017

Posted 2 weeks ago @

Topgolf
@Topgolf
Topgolf is the perfect place to host your corporate event! Flexible food & drink catering menu options and a dedicated staff make it fun and easy.


Caesars Entertainment offers meeting and event planners one dedicated team that works as a united front, committed to providing the most successful meeting experiences possible. Enjoy elite perks, rewards and privileges with our Total Rewards Meeting Diamond Program.

Click here to fill out the survey for your chance to win!

The post Weekly deals and highlights: November 8, 2017 appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Events to attend as a hosted buyer (in the next 6 months)

Posted 2 weeks, 1 day ago @

If you’re growing your professional education while on a budget, hosted-buyer programs may be just the kind of initiative you need.

hosted buyer WEC
Hosted buyer program at WEC

Speak with colleagues and search the web to learn first-hand about the particulars of each event’s hosted-buyer program as they do differ and some can feel onerous—but in general they offer excellent opportunities for you to attend the industry’s leading events at little or no cost. The following events have hosted-buyer programs worth checking out (and even if you’re not hosted, the education and networking is the best in the business and certainly worth attending).

IAEE Expo! Expo!

Nov. 28-30 – San Antonio, Texas

ibtm World

Nov. 28-30 – Barcelona, Spain

SITE + MPI Global Forum

Jan. 12-14 – Rome

PCMA Convening Leaders

Jan. 7-10 – Nashville

IMEX

May 15-17 – Frankfurt

World Education Congress – #Indy18

June 2-5 – Indianapolis

The post Events to attend as a hosted buyer (in the next 6 months) appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Retail therapy: A fresh experience for meetings and conferences

Posted 3 weeks, 1 day ago @

According to Psychology Today, retail therapy involves shopping with the aim of improving the mood of the buyer. The main benefits of retail therapy include escape, relaxation and rejuvenation.

In my most recent consumer interviews, online shopping is increasingly mentioned as type of mini mental vacation.”—Kit Yarrow Ph.D.

In fact, in a survey that Psychology Today shared, 62 percent of respondents reported going shopping to improve their mood.

If you’ve been an event or meeting planner for a while, sooner or later, you will come across a corporate client that asks you to cut down on content so that participants will have more time “for shopping.” When faced with these requests, it’s important to remember that shopping and learning don’t have to be mutually exclusive. It is possible to deliver content through a well-designed shopping experience.

I was reminded of this during IBTM Latin America when organizers included a tour of luxury retail center El Palacio de Los Palacios in the pre-show tour of Mexico City for hosted buyers. In small groups, the concierge team provided a tour that focused on how the architecture, sculpture and art work that the group had viewed on the city tour was incorporated into the design, décor and displays of the shopping center. For event professionals, it was an opportunity to pick up ideas for décor, tablescapes, color schemes, floral arrangements, lighting, catering and furnishing.

Designing the experience

Shopping experiences can be designed to appeal to all audiences, ages, professions and industries. It’s a matter of changing the focus. Clarify your objectives and the demographics of your group. This will determine the departments for participants to visit. Behind-the-scenes tours can be an opportunity for architects, restaurateurs and professionals specializing in IT, customer services, marketing, logistics and even engineering to uncover best practices.

shopping tourShopping experiences during foreign retreats and incentive trips can provide an opportunity to discover emerging technological trends to stay ahead of the curve. If there is a spousal program or if families are invited to join employees on the trip, some groups can visit fashion, tech gadgets, toy and children’s clothing departments. Avoid a cookie-cutter approach and customize the experience.

Here are some ideas for incorporating retail therapy into meetings, conferences and events.

For team building, I have arranged for teams to interview executives from luxury brands to identify best practices and how they could be applied to their own businesses. There was also a mystery shopping challenge for each team. To add the fun factor, photo challenges, trivia and shopping challenges were incorporated into the experience.

Debriefing retail therapy experiences

After the tour in Mexico City, participants were given 90 minutes to relax, shop and spend more time in areas of interest. Some participants walked around in groups. Others grabbed snacks in the café. I took advantage of the opportunity to sit quietly and reflect on the experience. I felt inspired to write this blog post so I spent part of my time blogging. Other approaches to debriefing the experience include the following.

  • Re-configure the teams and give team members a chance to compare their experiences. If you use this approach, don’t make it too formal. Give the teams the option of sitting and chatting or walking around and sharing what they’ve learned.
  • Some participants may welcome the opportunity for quiet reflection and recording their experience through journaling or blogging.
  • Participants can share their experiences informally if you serve afternoon tea or coffee and refreshments at the end of the tour.
  • Asking participants to document their experience by taking photos and sharing them on Instagram or through a Pinterest Board.
  • Upon returning to the meeting room, the re-configured or original teams can be given time to develop short presentations or reports to share with the entire group.
  • A panel interview with a representative from each team can also be used to share highlights from the experience.

Places to go for retail therapy

Any luxury retail center or discount shopping mall can provide an opportunity for groups to learn through retail therapy.

  • Mexico City: El Placio del Palacios
  • Paris: Galeries Lafayette
  • Dubai: Ibn Battuta Mall, Mall of Emirates
  • Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Starhill Gallery
  • Singapore: Orchard Road, Marina Bay Sands
  • New York: Saks Fifth Avenue, Tiffany’s, Union Square
  • Toronto: Yorkville Village, Eaton Centre, Holt Renfrew, Yorkdale Mall

Some establishments even offer structured tours or shopping experiences.

If your meeting or conference is falling into a rut, consider spicing them up with a retail therapy experience.

The post Retail therapy: A fresh experience for meetings and conferences appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News

Food allergies and the ADA

Posted 4 weeks ago @

As a mom, I wouldn’t dream of bringing peanut-laden snacks for my sons after being told there was a child in the class with a serious peanut allergy. Our meetings should be likewise considerate of people with food allergies—because it’s the right thing to do. If that’s not reason enough, then because of the growing risk of liability for failing to do so.

Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) estimates that 15 million Americans have food allergies; nine million of those are adults. Seventeen million Europeans have food allergies. These figures don’t even include people with other dietary restrictions (e.g., low-sodium, low-cholesterol) or people following specific diets or styles of eating (e.g., Paleo, vegetarian).

Thrive! Meetings & Events, which has a special expertise in managing food allergies at meetings and events, estimates that 38% of meeting attendees worldwide have food allergies or other dietary restrictions. FARE suggests that close to half of fatal food allergy reactions are triggered by food consumed outside the home, which could easily include meetings or eating while traveling. It’s simply not possible for meeting planners to ignore the problem and yet planners often ask me, “Do I have to provide special meals for <insert dietary restriction>?” The ethical answer is, “Of course!” The legal answer, as is typical: “It depends.”

When the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) came out in 1990, it was intended to be an anti-discrimination law that afforded persons with disabilities equal opportunities in employment, government and public accommodations. For clarity, a person with a disability is defined as someone with “a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual.”

Yet for years, courts construed the ADA narrowly, and refused to grant disability status to those with severe food allergies. Cue sigh of relief from meeting planners, hotels and restaurants—and cry of frustration from those with serious food allergies.

But here’s the thing—times (and the law), they are a-changin’.

Like many new laws, over time it became apparent that the ADA was not being applied quite like it was intended. Indeed, the law was often being used as a sword rather than a shield—it was being used to exclude people from coverage rather than to include them. To fix this, the Americans with Disabilities Act was amended in 2008.

Gluten free tearsThe Americans with Disabilities Act as Amended (ADAAA) made many clarifications, including what constitute “major life activities” (including eating and breathing). The amendment was made in an effort to make the ADA more inclusive and is broader in scope than the original.

The gravity of these changes was made imminently clear in 2013 with the case United States Department of Justice v. Lesley University, in which a group of students with food allergies brought a complaint that the university required them to purchase a meal plan but refused to provide food options that accommodated their special needs. The U.S. Department of Justice agreed with the students and this became the first major case to apply the ADAAA to food allergies.

There will likely be more complaints and lawsuits to come, and the meeting and hospitality industries seem likely targets.

Be prepared.

The post Food allergies and the ADA appeared first on Plan Your Meetings @ Meeting Professionals International.

Category : Blog and Industry News